This Light-Filled Danish Summer Cottage is Available to Rent This Summer!

This Light-Filled Danish Summer Cottage is Available to Rent This Summer!


Looking for a Scandinavian adventure? This summer house on the Danish coast of North Zealand is waiting for its next guests, and looking at the pictures, I'd like that to be you or I! Described as a 'undisturbed sanctuary close to the waters edge' it's everything a Scandinavian summer house should be. Simply, yet practically furnished, it's full of light, natural materials and has a wonderful seamlessness between the indoors and outdoors. Ready to dream of summer days on the Danish coast? 

See more pictures - and find out more about booking this cabin as a holiday rental over at Landfolk
The way the doors open up to the outside remind me so much of our little cabin. I'm so hoping to stay there this weekend and finish the kitchen - I hope I can share some pictures with you soon. 

In the meantime, I can't resist sharing a few more danish summer home inspiration (you know me!). Check these out: 

Ha en dejlig dag! 

Niki

Photography courtesy of Landfolk, shared with kind permission. 


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est living colonnade house by splinter society 10

Unifying Eras in a Light-Filled Family Home


Splinter Society design a robust, contemporary residential addition in poetic juxtaposition to the heritage elegance of a family home in Melbourne’s leafy inner south-east.

Defined by an approach that mediates between heritage relevance and contemporary resilience, Colonnade House has emerged as a home with a proud duality.

A new rear extension has been realised through a design language that counterbalances the traditional Federation origins that define the home’s front section, with contemporary materials and refined aesthetics. Splinter Society carefully draw out similarities that can be found between old and new, highlighting the timelessness of the original while re-orienting key characteristics in an entirely modern way.   

Produced in partnership with Metro Steel Windows

Colonnade House by Splinter Society
Colonnade House by Splinter Society

The kitchen’s monochrome palette and material strength reflect the monolithic form of the colonnade while receding gently to allow for bolder hues of textiles and artworks throughout the home.

From the moment of entry, Colonnade House unfolds across eras to navigate from a traditional layout of contained bedrooms, bathrooms and a study at the front of the home through to a strikingly modern and open-plan expanse of living zones at the rear. The transition from old to new relies on candid response to the site, context and habitation. In creating a dialogue with the elegant heritage notes, the addition allows for an entirely modern adaptation of the home’s original characteristics. 

The old is adorned with decorative details, while the new contains a restrained modern decorative grain of refined steel, timber, render and tile detailing. The traditional layout contains closed-off rooms, while the extension uses architectural devices to create a free-flowing plan that maintains its spatial and programmatic definition. The old contains intersecting gabled rooflines, while the new mimics these with minimal geometric roof forms and lofty ceilings. The old features decorative timber windows, while newly created Metro Steel Windows steel framing abstracts their detail, linking old to new. Metro Steel Window’s innovative approach to elevating a traditional medium and exploring a more sustainable solution reveals itself through this successful linking of the period home and new extension.

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In the same way that the fine profiles of black steel reflect and juxtapose the black timber accents, the contemporary areas, laid out in an L-shape, are free-flowing spaces in direct contradiction to the closed intimacy in the period part of the home.

Colonnade House by Splinter Society

Filtered natural light spills through the blades of the colonnade that gives the home its name.

Colonnade House by Splinter Society

The De Sede DS-266 recliner chair and Wittmann Grain Cut table.

Colonnade House by Splinter Society

Clean, seamless black frames from Metro Steel Windows address both aesthetic purity and material resilience and connect the front of the home to the garden at the rear.

A conversation between the existing and contemporary sections of Colonnade House occurs through sensitivity to both materiality and form. A new entry between the original section of the home and the addition gestures towards the black painted timberwork throughout the bedrooms, bathrooms and office in the front section of the home before plunging inhabitants into the new. From there, Splinter Society has employed a literal unfolding of architecture as the new addition is navigated, a colonnade style from which the home takes its name. 

In the same way that the fine profiles of black steel reflect and juxtapose the black timber accents, the contemporary areas, laid out in an L-shape, are free-flowing spaces in direct contradiction to the closed intimacy in the period part of the home. Constructed primarily from concrete and largely devoid of colour, the living and kitchen spaces are austerely timeless, filled with natural light which flows through expanses of bespoke steel framed glazing, and work to emphasise the Federation elements through contrast, respectfully giving the two disparate aesthetics space to exist as separate but complementary elements.

Colonnade House by Splinter Society

Operable windows by Metro Steel Windows in the bedroom continue the clean, linear architectural character of the new extension. The bedroom also features a ‘Paris-au-Mois-Daout’ pendant in Kyris Grey.

The colonnade draws navigation through to the rear garden while filtering and screening light between interior and exterior. A collection of intimate, sunny, garden-connected window daybeds and pedestals to house sculptures sit between the columns, which in turn support a simple black gable formed roof. 

The control of both natural and artificial light is integral to the home’s ambience while supporting the owner’s artistic vocation. The colonnade form also works to frame views of the surrounding garden while directing the fall of light across a tactile curation of surfaces which unite a diverse rotation of artworks in the home.

Colonnade House by Splinter Society
Colonnade House by Splinter Society
Colonnade House by Splinter Society

A palette of hand brushed timbers, plasters, concrete, and ceramic tiles provides a muted backdrop further elevated by dark mirrors, metal sheeting, and decorative steelwork to enhance and reflect these surfaces. Every design facet of Colonnade House works in concert to create an overarching sense of unity and intent.

Splinter Society has drawn on the timeless aesthetics and enduring structural integrity of concrete and steel throughout the home. The home assumes a new identity through the use of classic profile steel-framed doors and windows that support the striking expanses of glazing, the architectural purity of concrete and the geometric precision of the colonnade. The outcome is a light-drenched family home that considers heritage and contemporary dialogues in a way that allows both to exist independently but in seamless accord. 

Colonnade House by Splinter Society

Splinter Society’s new rear extension has inserted a bold new persona at Colonnade House, respecting the Federation-era origins without competing with them.

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Colonnade House by Splinter Society
Colonnade House by Splinter Society

Splinter Society has unified the front federation style of the home with the overtly contemporary new rear addition through the creation of candid dialogue between the two.

The post Unifying Eras in a Light-Filled Family Home appeared first on Est Living | Interiors, Architecture, Designers & Products.



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A Beautiful Light-Filled Sunroom in Holland

A Beautiful Light-Filled Sunroom in Holland


Hello there! Thank you for your patience, we're back after bottling up as much sunshine as our EasyJet baggage allowance would permit - not much then! But still, nice to get a little boost and see my sister and nieces before the darkness sets in! While on the subject of darkness, the clocks went back on Saturday which means cosy season has just begun. Have they changed where you are too? This means two things: 1. Ramping up on candles and warm lighting to amp up the hygge and 2. Working on capturing as much daylight in the home as physically possible during waking hours. And it's the latter which is the subject of today's post!

I've talked about the popularity of greenhouses (remember this beautiful Swedish one?) - but a space that REALLY comes into its own at this time of year is a sunroom. Sunrooms come in all shapes and sizes from ornate conservatories to a simple balcony with wrap-around glass - but they're all based on the same principal: enjoying the daylight while staying toasty. And this incredible 'vintergården' (Swedish for 'winter garden') in the home of Wiola (@rapsiodia_w) and her family in Leiden, The Netherlands is a dream!

Wiola's sunroom doubles up as a place to relax, a guest bedroom under the stars and a home office. And her cats love it (of course!). 


I have my eye on this sofa bed for our tiny cabin (look out for the update later this week). It's designed by Karup specifically for small spaces. 

In the corner I spy a lemon tree, with a LOAD of lemons on it. I have become ever so slightly obsessed with my lemon tree lately (just ask my family). Yesterday I ceremoniously brought it indoors for the winter as the temperatures. Mine only has two lemons on it (which Per refers to as the most expensive lemons of all time due to the level of man hours and nutrition involved!). Do you own a citrus plant of some kind? If so, you might well understand what I'm talking about! 


The art - the largest of which is by Marta Chmielecka - focuses on nature, a perfect way to connect the space with the garden. I also love the felt wall lamp from sustainable design shop Luma Lano. 

I have been a fan of this desk from IKEA for many years as it's perfect for smaller, narrow spaces. 

But more importantly, have I mentioned the floor yet? Soooo beautiful, don't you think?


What a wonderful space to enjoy at this time of year! I can definitely imagine curling up here on a Sunday afternoon with a cup of tea and a book, how about you? 

Not got the space for a sunroom? Join the club! No worries though, I find simply rearranging the furniture a little to ensure you have somewhere to sit by the window can work wonders at this time of year. 

I have to say, it's been such a long time since I featured a Dutch home. Here are a few other Dutch spaces to enjoy today:

Have a great start to the week! 

Niki

Photography courtesy of @rapsodia_w with kind permission 



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